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@DanO Yeah that's what I was talking about i.e. mine em up there and use em up there for your needs is the only way forward in exploring and colonizing the space.
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@Excelsior @DanO - but are you going to volunteer to be one of the first Galactic Geos to help with space exploration? :-) You just may uncover an #Unobtainium deposit like in Avatar. Space Mining on another planet in Avatar: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HRf7a5wkrt4+ What Unobtainium really is   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OQmcAGZk1Is+
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@Brandon @Excelsior: you joke, but I'd be surprised if there are any geos in space for mining any time soon. The most difficult and costly thing by far to do in space is to support human life. Far more likely you will see fully automated and robotic space "mines" working away on these asteroids which then shuttle the end product back to key locations (a Lagrange point or something to that effect)
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@TheGalvanizer Last man to set foot on the moon was not just an astronaut but a geo! sadly passed away recently iirc
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@Excelsior @Brandon - Agreed. Most of the articles I've come across mention robotic mining methods and automated processes for locating & scanning for deposits, as well as extraction. There clearly needs to be geos involved in the process, but they'll likely supervise the projects from the safety of Earth or an orbiting space craft.
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@TheGalvanizer correction : second to last person on the moon a geologist! HARRISON "JACK" SCHMITT Schmitt, 81, was the first scientist astronaut, a geologist who got to walk on the moon on Apollo 17 and was the next to last person on the moon, getting in the lander before Cernan. He later was elected to the U.S. Senate from New Mexico. He teaches a bit at the University of Wisconsin and is a prominent scientist who rejects the mainstream view of man-made global warming.
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@BS When mining asteroids you would mine those that have the highest grade of the metal(s) you're looking for. That detection can probably be done by hyperspectral sensors, so remotely. There will be geo's involved, but they won't have to take samples themselves, or run away for bears in the process.
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@DanO Yeah Harisson Schmitt is our only geo to land, map & sample another planet.
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@Brandon @BS: grade is actually far less important than delta-v for asteroids. A rich, but distant, asteroid is way too problematic to mine. The specific impulse of propellant we use now is just too low to mine anything that isn't close to Earth orbit.
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@Excelsior Wouldn't most of the asteroids that would be mined be located between Mars and Jupiter in the belt? Of course their distance to the Earth would fluctuate based on their orbits around the sun in relation to us.
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@TheGalvanizer Sounds like a job for Matt Damon
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@Excelsior Ha! The Martian was good, and he was good in Interstellar as the surprise cameo. What about Bruce Willis as backup from his drilling experience on the asteroid in Armageddon? http://moviesstak.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/Armageddon-1998-Movie-Free-Download-720p-BluRay-1.jpg+
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@TheGalvanizer I surprisingly enjoyed the Martian. Not surprisingly felt very different to a Will Smith-less Independence Day reboot
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@Brandon No, the asteroids we'd mine would not be in the "asteroid belt" between Mars and Jupiter. There are scores of asteroids at all points in the solar system and first priority would absolutely be NEOs, or Near Earth Objects.
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@Excelsior @Brandon - I guess we are tracking many of the Near Earth Objects, but most of those are rogue, so to ascertain if they had the right minerals would be costly to track them down 1 at time. My thoughts were that in the "belt" there would be the law of averages and enough to chose from to find the better endowed asteroids. I really was only half joking when I made the comments up above to @DanO, but regardless, it has been a fun thought experiment. Thanks!
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@TheGalvanizer Need a shell for the space net I plan to finance
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@Excelsior That's it.... a space net. Talk about grab samples.....
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@DanO Good ideas. We only need a bottle of whiskey and some financiers from Google, Tesla etc
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@DanO Speaking of climate change. Because you reminded us of Harisson Schmitt and other NASA astronauts that do not believe in man-made climate change. Well, there are many geologists, climatologists, weather men etc that consider the change as being nothing but natural. Along that line a few days ago I posted a piece on my blog 'The Geologic Record and Climate Change' http://www.miningandmoney.com/single-post/2017/02/04/The-Geologic-Record-and-Climate-Change by Dr. Tim Patterson a Quaternary geologist. Of course that (other than the Sun) there are other cycles that have influenced the Earth (climate, life etc) and they are ranging from solar system cycles to galactic cycles (Milky Way), from meteorites bombardment to cosmic events/rays (supernovas), from magnetic poles reversals to continental drift.
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@TheGalvanizer I have the whisky @DanO
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@DanO @TheGalvanizer I knew it! Don't post your address online though or we're going to have a facebook party :)
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@Brandon What a stupid article you cited on your website, @DanO. Amazing how many climate change skeptics cherry pick data to suit their bias. You'll note that the Patterson article was written in 2005, and yet only one of his charts even goes to 2004. The rest end in the 90s. This is still common now where skeptics talk about how the temperature has leveled off or even decreased recently, and they always cite data that conveniently ends at 2013 which ommits the fact that 2014 was hot and 2015 were both record years for human history. Honestly, if you're denying the data right in front of your face I'd not trust any analysis you do. https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/thumbnails/image/2016temperature.png+
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@DanO @Brandon Let me remind you that my analysis has nothing to do with climate change - it is geology, mining, etc related. Anyway being a geologist (and not a brain washed one) I have a broad view of the problem (the big picture) and I take into consideration ALL that has happened with this planet over hundred of millions of years. Climate change partisans look only at a minuscule slice of data (~120 years vs hundred of millions or even the Quaternary period which is 1.8 million years) and draw conclusions. The thing is that many of the climate change beliebers are extremist in their views and do not accept or consider that there is scientific geological evidence that indicate that other factors are at work and responsible for the slight raise in temperature that we have experienced lately. Being open to other interpretations is what a scientist should be when analyzing phenomenons that we do not completely understand. Btw your graph shows a significant temperature increase in the 1940s while CO2 levels were down. The article that I cited tries and succeeds I think in explaining that fact. But you know there are many more geological articles (or other scientific studies) that I could quote. Just saying.
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@EvenPrime @Brandon 's temperature map from nasa's website technically isn't very useful without uncertainty bars. As a scientist Im open to skepticism with global warming. It definitely can be attributed to other factors. I will say this though,http://www.niagarafallslive.com look at that picture of Niagara Falls.
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@EvenPrime Right now the world is burning 3x that amount. Its hard to imagine that we are not making an impact. That is the non-scientist side of me speaking hehe.
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@EvenPrime Good article u posted @DanO. I enjoy reading all sides of an arguement
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@DanO Planet acquires rival satellite company from Google http://spaceflightnow.com/2017/02/06/planet-acquires-rival-satellite-company-from-google/
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@BS Satellite imagery has become fairly commoditised in past years, more competition and lower margin. Optical imagery, that is. A lot can be done with freely available data such as Landsat, Sentinel, SRTM DEM (Digital Elevation Model) Alow World3D (another DEM), and radar data. If you look at hyperspectral data, it would be nice if higher resolution satellites become available (for explorationists at least). Right now there's ASTER (free, but limited resolution and amount of bands), Hyperion (poor coverage due to narrow acquisition swath) and WorldView 3 (highest resolution, for which you have to pay). Lots can be done with satellite data, especially in the earlier stages of exploration. So lower prices/better free data is a good thing for us!
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@DanO China's 2016 #zinc conc deficit widens to 448,000 mt on environment monitoring https://goo.gl/kZ46NV
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@DanO Trail #zinc output set to dip from record level in 2017: Teck https://goo.gl/Z4cvCS
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@DanO An update on $ion would be published and sent to subscribers www.miningandmoney.com Stay tuned!
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@CriticalInvestor @DanO I subscribed again, let's see if it works now
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@DanO A quick reminder to $ion shareholders. #Lithium is nowadays touted as the new (or even better than) gold. Mark Twain used to say:"A mine is a hole in the ground. The discoverer of it is a natural liar. The hole in the ground and the liar combine and issue shares and trap fools." While investors are generally used to figure out hardrock deposits the brine deposits represent a new frontier and some unscrupulous individuals take advantage of that. Read the first part on $ion (attached) then wait for (and read) the second part that would be emailed & published later today or tomorrow morning. After reading that you might consider asking the bully CEO/Trump hater/gold 'bug'/'journalist'/promoter/hockey & horse racing fan to come back from his Mexican vacation. http://cdn.ceo.ca/1cabodp-Alset%201st.pdf
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@CriticalInvestor @DanO Better look into that Mg/Li ratio again, I read somewhere this was insanely high, 60:1 or something whereas 8:1 is a maximum
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@DanO @RedLakeCapital @nobshere I will not post anything until Monday so you'd have time to sort your $ion business out. I am doing this for you.
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@90bigpicture terrific analysis and write up @DanO
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@DanO TY gents!
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@DanO Btw the upcoming report would deal with their assay results. Cheers.
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@CriticalInvestor DanO here is the link to Li/Mg data so you can see with everybody else that their ratio (at least based on those samples) is uneconomic by any standard https://alsetenergy.ca/assets/docs/presentations/assay.pdf
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@CriticalInvestor When I hear lithium in Mexico I Always refer to Bacanora, it is clay based and has a huge recovery issue it seems as I don't see pilot tests on that roasting method they need. I read a thing or two on clay too with Alset
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@DanO TY @CI.
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@DanO Glad to see that $ion is up for the day on high volume. Happy unloading :)
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@Tim_Oliver Don't compare Mg and Li ratios from Whole rock digestion. Only compare ratio in brine solution.
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@DanO I know Tim :)
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@CriticalInvestor Could you explain this a bit further to me Tim? Right now it looks they almost better call it a magnesium operation with Li for byproduct;) Fe is too high too btw, same thing? Tnx
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@DanO The $ion paper had been released. Read it on www.miningandmoney.com home page. Click on the link. Comments? let me know.
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@DanO I ran some $lix data on their initial solar evaporation ponds (nr) thru my calculator but I am getting that they would be able to produce only 700-800 tpa LCE by using their 63 ha lined ponds. In other words they need to build more ponds (170 ha to 230 ha in total) to be able to reach their stated/nameplate 2,500 tpa LCE production. Potash does not add that much value maybe another 50 tpa LCE equivalent. http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/lithium-x-receives-permits-for-construction-of-initial-ponding-facility-at-flagship-sal-de-los-angeles-project-614368643.html
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@DanO $lix Also 'As a result of a review by the British Columbia Securities Commission, the Company is issuing the following news release to clarify its disclosure.' http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/lithium-x-issues-news-release-614291543.html Nothing bad here. Getting rid of old data. New report on the way.
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@DanO I have also expected that they buy into another project which they just did. Arizaro salar might be good. I'll check it out later. $lix
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